Essay on Cowards Die a Thousand Deaths


  1. This was said in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. It is a part of a discourse by Caesar in answer to Calpurnia who cautioned that he ought not go out as malevolent signs indicate some peril to his life. Caesar declines to concur and pronounces that demise has no dread for him. He transcends weakness and overlooks the risks. "Fear", he says, does not exist in his vocabulary. He tosses a test at death and declines to be unnerved by it. He would never have been an extraordinary warrior in the event that he had dread of death. 

  2. Passing is unavoidable. No one has ever vanquished passing. Passing goes to all—lords and hobos, rich and poor, rulers in their royal residences and beggar in their cabins. Demise lays its hand upon all animals. It does as such without refinement or segregation. Knowing the supremacy of death, it is an indiscretion for a man to tremble with dread at the prospect of it. It demonstrates an express absence of soul to turn pale at the say of death. It is extraordinary weakness to contract from the threats of life and characteristic of dauntlessness to face them. 

  3. Steady dread frequents a defeatist. His heart sinks inspired by a paranoid fear of death which resembles a sword of Damocles hanging over his head. The episode of war, an uproar, the tremors of a seismic tremor, the possibility of a starvation or a surge all these make the defeatist shiver with dread since he imagines that he will be the principal target. In the event that he remains on the ocean shore or a waterway bank a flood of dread compasses over him at being inadvertently suffocated. As he strolls along a street, he is additional watchful not to venture down the asphalt for fear that he ought to be keep running over by an omnibus. He realizes that demise jumps upon a man all of a sudden and in an assortment of ways and thusly his life is a nonstop bad dream. Each time he hears that somebody has kicked the bucket, he expresses gratitude toward God all alone escape. 

  4. A defeatist endures a thousand circumstances more torment and anguish at the fanciful prospect of death than by the occasion itself. For he meets his demise commonly in his creative ability and bears all the loathsomeness associated with it. He even goes ahead to envision the sufferings that are in store for him past the grave. 

  5. As against this, an overcome man keeps up a mentality of disobedience towards demise. He understands the way that passing must come at some point or another and that it is no utilization denying this reality. For death is a fundamental part of the plan of thing: this wander of dirt, this gross tissue should some time or another turn into an icy, coldhearted and dead stock. It is, along these lines, vain to pity oneself at the possibility of death. Moreover, with fearlessness and determination one may well sidestep demise ordinarily. 

  6. Passing is just a characteristic fulfillment of life. The reality of the matter is that unexpected passing is disastrous and that it is the possibility of biting the dust before the time that strikes fear into the hearts of a great many people. Be that as it may, in the event that one is to bite the dust rashly, no griping or self indulgence can modify the reality. Nobody can anticipate mishaps, pestilences and different types of sudden passing. It is, in this manner, insignificant to dread; it is smarter to safeguard a state of mind of quietness and peacefulness notwithstanding both great and wickedness.

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