Essay on Variety is the mother of enjoyment


  1. We as a whole despise dreariness. It makes us feel dull as day by day eat less. There is in man a longing for change, for assortment, for infrequent exchange of intrigue. It has been well said that workmanship is the unsettling influence of dullness. Tennyson says, "Great satisfies himself from multiple points of view." If life is to be made into a craftsmanship, on the off chance that it is to be made into something charming and pleasant, it is important to break the dull consistency that is stifling. Change is the mystery spring of life. 

  2. Some measure of tedium is unpreventable in every day life. Routine itself proposes consistency or need of assortment; we need to accomplish a concept that boggles any weak minded person for an extend of time. In any case, after a spell of strenuous work, we ought to attempt to discover time to accomplish something that is reviving, that changes from the mechanical consistency of our ordinary propensities and interests. The understudy freed from the classroom must hurried to the play area to get over mental tiredness with physical work out. 

  3. The specialists liberated from the drudgery of office or workshop must go to a club where they can talk and giggle unreservedly, or unwind at a silver screen or a theater, or get agreeably energized at a football or cricket coordinate. Work must exchange with play. For the assortment of simple, nothing can give more delight than the consistency of something. It is in this scan for assortment as an escape from consistency that all workmanship has begun: move, sing, and play are just the declaration of man's yearning for something that would help him overlook "the overwhelming and tired weight of this confused word." 

  4. Be that as it may, there is a risk to be prepared for. Nothing can be more self-destructive to sorted out development and advancement than this. We should not be slaves to propensity; for that lone end in solidifying the sound versatility of the brain. 

  5. Since assortment adds flavor or zest to life, it has turned into an essential law of our natural presence. Additionally, it is intrinsic in the very way of things. Matters contrast notwithstanding when they appear to concur. No two men are similar, nor do they think and act alike, — not notwithstanding when they are twin children. 

  6. Nature nearly appears to treat us by its case to welcome assortment, favors differing qualities to tedium with sensible changes. He who declines to acknowledge the test that change holds out to us, will be a visually impaired viewer. Just the progressions must be in amicability with the focal law of life. Sages say that Omnipotent God was initially the whole gang alone. It is to taste and appreciate assortment that He made the universe with the interminable differing qualities.

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