The Million Dollar Homepage is a website


  • The Million Dollar Landing page is a site imagined in 2005 by Alex Tew, an understudy from Wiltshire, Britain, to raise cash for his college training. The landing page comprises of a million pixels orchestrated in a 1000 × 1000 pixel lattice; the picture construct connects in light of it were sold for $1 per pixel in 10 × 10 pieces. The buyers of these pixel pieces gave small pictures to be shown on them, a URL to which the pictures were connected, and a trademark to be shown while drifting a cursor over the connection. The point of the site was to offer the majority of the pixels in the picture, subsequently producing a million dollars of wage for the designer. The Money Road Diary has remarked that the webpage enlivened different sites that offer pixels.[2][3] 

  • Propelled on 26 August 2005, the site turned into a Web wonder. The Alexa positioning of web movement topped at around 127; starting 9 May 2009, it is 40,044.[4] On 1 January 2006, the last 1,000 pixels were set available to be purchased on eBay. The sale shut on 11 January with a triumphant offer of $38,100 that brought the last count to $1,037,100 in gross pay. 

  • Amid the January 2006 closeout, the site was liable to a circulated foreswearing of-administration assault (DDOS) and payoff request, which left it distant to guests for a week while its security framework was overhauled. The Government Agency of Examination and Wiltshire Constabulary researched the assault and coercion attempt.Alex Tew, an understudy from Cricklade in Wiltshire, Britain, imagined The Million Dollar Landing page in August 2005 when he was 21 years old.[8] He was going to start a three-year Business Administration course at the College of Nottingham, and was worried that he would be left with an understudy credit that could take years to repay.[8] As a cash raising thought, Tew chose to offer a million pixels on a site for $1 every; buyers would include their own picture, logo or notice, and have the choice of including a hyperlink to their site. Pixels were sold for US dollars as opposed to UK pounds; the US has a bigger online populace than the UK, and Tew trusted more individuals would identify with the idea if the pixels were sold in US currency.[9] In 2005, the pound was solid against the dollar: £1 was worth roughly $1.80,[10] and that cost per pixel may have been excessively costly for some potential buyers.[9] Tew's setup expenses were €50, which paid for the enlistment of the space name and a fundamental web-facilitating bundle. The site went live on 26 August 2005.[11] 

  • The landing page included a Web standard with the webpage's name and a pixel counter showing the quantity of pixels sold, a route bar containing nine little connections to the website's inward site pages, and a vacant square matrix of 1,000,000 pixels partitioned into 10,000 100-pixel blocks.[12] Tew guaranteed clients that the website would stay online for no less than five years – that is, until no less than 26 August 2010.Because individual pixels are too little to be seen effortlessly, Pixels were sold in 100-pixel "pieces" measuring 10 × 10 pixels; the base cost was in this manner $100.[15][16] The principal deal, three days after the website started working, was to an online music site worked by a companion of Tew's. He purchased 400 pixels in a 20 × 20 piece. Following two weeks, Tew's loved ones had obtained an aggregate of 4,700 pixels.[8][17] The webpage was at first advertised just through expression of mouth;[3] be that as it may, after the website had made $1,000, an official statement was conveyed that was grabbed by the BBC.[8][17] The innovation news site The Enlist highlighted two articles on The Million Dollar Landing page in September.[18][19] Before the month's over, The Million Dollar Landing page had gotten $250,000 and was positioned Number 3 on Alexa Web's rundown of "Movers and Shakers" behind the sites for Britney Lances and Photograph Region News.[20] On 6 October, Tew reported the website got 65,000 interesting guests; it got 1465 Diggs, getting to be a standout amongst the most Dugg connections that week.[21] Eleven days after the fact, the number had expanded to 100,000 exceptional guests. On 26 October, two months after the Million Dollar Landing page was propelled, more than 500,900 pixels had been sold to 1,400 customers.[22] By New Year's Eve, Tew reported that the site was getting hits from 25,000 one of a kind guests consistently and had an Alexa Rank of 127,[22] and that 999,000 of the 1,000,000 pixels had been sold.[3] 

  • On 1 January 2006, Tew reported that on the grounds that the request was so awesome for the last 1,000 pixels, "the most reasonable and consistent thing" to do was sale them on eBay as opposed to lose "the respectability and level of selectiveness characteristic for the million-pixel idea" by propelling a second Million Dollar Homepage.[22] The bartering endured ten days and got 99 honest to goodness offers. In spite of the fact that offers were gotten for sums as high as $160,109.99, numerous were either withdrawn by the bidders or crossed out as hoaxes.[23][24] "I really reached the general population by telephone and turns out they weren't not kidding, which is genuinely disappointing, so I evacuated those bidders ultimately", said Tew.[23] The triumphant offer was $38,100,[25] set by MillionDollarWeightLoss.com, an online store offering diet-related products.[26] Tew commented that he had expected the last offer add up to be higher because of the media attention.[23] The Million Dollar Landing page made a gross aggregate of $1,037,100 in five months.[24][27] After expenses, charges and a gift to The Sovereign's Trust, a philanthropy for youngsters, Tew anticipated that his net salary would be $650,000–$700,000.By November the site was getting to be prevalent around the globe, accepting consideration from Money related Times Deutschland in Germany,[33] TVNZ in New Zealand,[34] Land Arranges in Latin America,[35] the China Daily,[36] and particularly in the Unified States where it was secured in Adweek,[37] Florida Today,[38] and Money Road Journal.[2] Tew enlisted a US-based marketing expert to help with the consideration from the American media and made a week-long outing to the US, where he was met on ABC News Radio,[39] the Fox News Channel,[40] Assault of the Show!,[41] and nearby news programmes.

  • The idea was depicted as "straightforward and brilliant",[38] "clever",[44] "ingenious",[17] and "a remarkable stage [for advertising] which is additionally a touch of fun".[29] Teacher Martin Binks, chief of the Nottingham College Organization for Entrepreneurial Advancement, said, "It is splendid in its straightforwardness ... sponsors have been pulled in to it by its curiosity ... the site has turned into a phenomenon."[17] Mainstream Mechanics said, "There's no substance. No cool illustrations, giveaways or hot Paris Hilton recordings for viewers to salivate over. Envision a Television slot that shows only plugs, a magazine with only promotions. That is The Million Dollar Landing page. An astounding case of the force of viral marketing".[45] Wear Oldenburg of the Washington Post was one of only a handful few without acclaim for the site, calling it a "shabby, personality bogglingly lucrative showcasing hulk, a promoting barren wilderness of spam, pennant advertisements and pop-ups."[16] Oldenburg proceeds with, "it would appear that a notice board on originator steroids, a publicizing train wreck you can't not take a gander at. It resembles getting each appear promotion you ever got in your life, without a moment's delay. It's what might as well be called all of a sudden feeling like you need to take a shower. 

  • As the last pixels were being unloaded, Tew was met on Richard and Judy,and profiled in the online BBC News Magazine.The Money Road Diary expounded on The Million Dollar Landing page and its effect on the Web people group. "Mr. Tew himself has gone up against big name status in the Web people group ... the imaginative juice ... paints a fascinating picture of online entrepreneurship".

  • Tew dropped out of the business degree the webpage was set up to subsidize after one term.[In 2008, Tew established Popjam, a Web collection and person to person communication business.On 7 January 2006, three days before the sale of the last 1,000 pixels was because of end, Tew got an email from an association called "The Dim Gathering", and was told The Million Dollar Landing page would turn into the casualty of an appropriated foreswearing of-administration assault (DDoS) if a payoff of $5,000 was not paid by 10 January. Trusting the risk to be a lie, he overlooked it, however after a week got a second email danger: "Hi u site is under us atack to stop the DDoS send us 50000$."Once more, he disregarded the risk, and the site was overwhelmed with additional movement and messages, making it crash. "I haven't answered to any of them as I would prefer not to give them the fulfillment and I absolutely don't expect to pay them any cash. What is occurring to my site resemble fear based oppression. On the off chance that you pay them, new assaults will begin," Tew said. 

  • The site was out of reach to guests for a week until the host server redesigned the security framework, and separated activity through hostile to DDoS software.Wiltshire Constabulary's Hey Tech Wrongdoing Unit and the Government Agency of Examination were called to explore the coercion and assault; they trusted it started in Russia.

  • Comparative websites

  • Numerous different locales offer publicizing by pixels.Tew said of the destinations, " appeared very quickly; now there are many Sites offering pixels. The copycats are all contending with each other."...they have almost no promotions, in this way I get it's not going too well for them. The thought just works once and depends on curiosity ... any duplicate feline destinations will just have unadulterated comic drama esteem, though mine conceivably has a touch of parody In addition to some real draw in promoting dollars ... so I say good fortunes to the imitators.

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